Laparoscopic surgery

Hernia

 

Hernia - inguinal; Inguinal hernia; Rupture; Strangulation; Incarceration

Last reviewed: November 5, 2010.

hernia2.jpg

 

 

A hernia is usually a sac formed by the lining of the abdominal cavity (peritoneum).

 

The sac comes through a hole or weak area in the fascia, the strong layer of the abdominal wall that surrounds the muscle.

 

 

 

 

The types of hernias are based on where they occur:

  • Femoral hernia appears as a bulge in the upper thigh. This type is more common in women than men.
  • Hiatal hernia occurs in the upper part of the stomach.
  • Incisional hernia can occur through a scar if you have had abdominal surgery in the past.
  • Inguinal hernia appears as a bulge in the groin. This type is more common in men than women. The bulge may go all the way down into the scrotum.
  • Umbilical hernia appears as a bulge around the belly button. It occurs when the muscle around the navel doesn't close completely.

 

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Usually, there is no obvious cause of a hernia. Sometimes hernias occur with heavy lifting. Hernias may be present at birth, but the bulging may not be noticeable until later in life. Some patients may have a family history of hernias.

Hernias can be seen in infants and children. This can happen when the lining around the abdominal organs does not close properly before birth. About 5 out of 100 children have inguinal hernias (more boys than girls). Some children may not have symptoms until they are adults.

Any activity or medical problem that increases pressure on the abdominal wall tissue and muscles may lead to a hernia, including:

  • Chronic constipation, straining to have bowel movements
  • Chronic cough
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Enlarged prostate, straining to urinate
  • Extra weight
  • Heavy lifting
  • Poor nutrition
  • Smoking
  • Overexertion
  • Undescended testicles

Symptoms

Most often there are no symptoms. However, sometimes there may be discomfort or pain. The discomfort may be worse when you stand, strain, or lift heavy objects.

Although a hernia may only cause mild discomfort, it may get bigger and strangulate. This means that the tissue is stuck inside the hole and its blood supply has been cut off. If this occurs, you will need urgent surgery.

Signs and tests

A doctor can confirm the presence of a hernia during a physical exam. The mass may increase in size when coughing, bending, lifting, or straining.

The hernia (bulge) may not be obvious in infants and children, except when the child is crying or coughing. In some cases, anultrasound may be needed to look for a hernia.

Treatment

Surgery is the only treatment that can permanently fix a hernia. However, smaller hernias with no symptoms can sometimes be watched. Surgery may have more risk for patients with serious medical problems.

Surgery will usually be used for hernias that are getting larger or are painful. Surgery secures the weakened abdominal wall tissue (fascia) and will close any holes. Today, most hernias are closed with cloth patches to plug up the holes.

An umbilical hernia that fails to heal on its own by the time your child is 5 years old may be repaired.

 

A.D.A.M., Disclaimer


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